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bbww:

eyeballmansion:

imaskumaskwemasks:Esiste qualcosa di fatale nell’eccitazione febbrile della produzione industriale di personalità in scatola, di identità usa e getta o di altri caratteri isterici. Piuttosto che rendersi conto del loro vuoto sostanziale, gli uomini per lo più preferiscono indietreggiare impauriti dinanzi alla vertigine di un’assenza totale di proprietà, di un’indeterminazione radicale - e dunque, in fondo, davanti al baratro delle loro libertà.(via superposee, a-alena)

bbww:

eyeballmansion:

imaskumaskwemasks:Esiste qualcosa di fatale nell’eccitazione febbrile della produzione industriale di personalità in scatola, di identità usa e getta o di altri caratteri isterici. Piuttosto che rendersi conto del loro vuoto sostanziale, gli uomini per lo più preferiscono indietreggiare impauriti dinanzi alla vertigine di un’assenza totale di proprietà, di un’indeterminazione radicale - e dunque, in fondo, davanti al baratro delle loro libertà.(via superposee, a-alena)

Through participatory networks over 500 people from across the UK, Sweden, USA and Canada have contributed their creative skills to collectively make works in the Open Source Embroidery exhibition. Including the Html Patchwork of 216 patches each stitched with their RGB colour code.

Through participatory networks over 500 people from across the UK, Sweden, USA and Canada have contributed their creative skills to collectively make works in the Open Source Embroidery exhibition. Including the Html Patchwork of 216 patches each stitched with their RGB colour code.

Fire from the mind, as vigour from the limb;
And life’s enchanted cup but sparkles near the brim.

—Lord Byron - Childe Harold Canto III St. 8

"The holloware chalices of Fenster address themselves pertinently to the ceremonial functions for which they are intended."

—Objects:USA by Lee Nordness 1970

Kiddush Cup: sterling silver, raised, cast, fabricated , Fred Fenster, 7” high , 1969

Fire from the mind, as vigour from the limb; And life’s enchanted cup but sparkles near the brim.

—Lord Byron - Childe Harold Canto III St. 8

"The holloware chalices of Fenster address themselves pertinently to the ceremonial functions for which they are intended."

Objects:USA by Lee Nordness 1970

Kiddush Cup: sterling silver, raised, cast, fabricated , Fred Fenster, 7” high , 1969

"Omnibuses, exceeding a hundred in number, roll incessantly over the paved streets, administering equally to the purposes of business and pleasure…forming an object of such prominent attraction, as to cause New York not inaptly to be termed "The City of Omnibuses""
—New York Gazette and General Advertiser 1834

"Omnibuses, exceeding a hundred in number, roll incessantly over the paved streets, administering equally to the purposes of business and pleasure…forming an object of such prominent attraction, as to cause New York not inaptly to be termed "The City of Omnibuses"" —New York Gazette and General Advertiser 1834

"Ronald Clyne, who died in 2006, made over 500 sleeves for the Folkways label, which was founded by Polish-born Moses ‘Moe’ Asch in New York in 1948. Under Asch’s direction, the label evolved into a fascinating repository for field recordings, spoken word, poetry and indigenous compositions."

Creative Review - Art for anything that is sound)

"Ronald Clyne, who died in 2006, made over 500 sleeves for the Folkways label, which was founded by Polish-born Moses ‘Moe’ Asch in New York in 1948. Under Asch’s direction, the label evolved into a fascinating repository for field recordings, spoken word, poetry and indigenous compositions."

Creative Review - Art for anything that is sound)

"We penetrated deeper and deeper into the heart of darkness.

It was very quiet there. At night sometimes the roll of drums behind the curtain of trees would run up the river and
remain sustained faintly, as if hovering in the air high over our heads, till the first break of day. Whether it meant war, peace, or prayer we could not tell.

[…]

Were were wanderers on a prehistoric earth, on an earth that wore the aspect of an unknown planet. We could have fancied ourselves the first of men taking possession of an accursed inheritance, to be subdued at the cost of profound anguish and of excessive toil. But suddenly, as we struggled round a bend, there would be a glimpse of rush walls, of peaked grass–roofs, a burst of yells, a whirl of black limbs, a mass of hands clapping. of feet stamping, of bodies swaying, of eyes rolling, under the droop of heavy and motionless foliage. The steamer toiled along slowly on the edge of a black and incomprehensible frenzy. The prehistoric man was cursing us, praying to us, welcoming us—who could tell? We were cut off from the comprehension of our surroundings; we glided past like phantoms, wondering and secretly appalled, as sane men would be before an enthusiastic outbreak in a madhouse.

[…]

The earth seemed unearthly. We are accustomed to look upon the shackled form of a conquered monster, but there—there you could look at a thing monstrous and free. It was unearthly, and the men were—No, they were not inhuman. Well, you know, that was the worst of it—this suspicion of their not being inhuman. It would come slowly to one. They howled and leaped, and spun, and made horrid faces; but what thrilled you was just the thought of their humanity—like yours—the thought of your remote kinship with this wild and passionate uproar. Ugly. Yes, it was ugly enough; but if you were man enough you would admit to yourself that there was in you just the faintest trace of a response to the terrible frankness of that noise, a dim suspicion of there being a meaning in it which you—you so remote from the night of first ages—could comprehend. And why not? The mind of man is capable of anything—because everything is in it, all the past as well as all the future. What was there after all? Joy, fear, sorrow, devotion, valour, rage—who can tell?—but truth—truth stripped of its cloak of time.”

—Joseph Conrad, Heart of Darkness ,1902

FFFFOUND! | Phyllis Galembo

"We penetrated deeper and deeper into the heart of darkness.

It was very quiet there. At night sometimes the roll of drums behind the curtain of trees would run up the river and remain sustained faintly, as if hovering in the air high over our heads, till the first break of day. Whether it meant war, peace, or prayer we could not tell.

[…]

Were were wanderers on a prehistoric earth, on an earth that wore the aspect of an unknown planet. We could have fancied ourselves the first of men taking possession of an accursed inheritance, to be subdued at the cost of profound anguish and of excessive toil. But suddenly, as we struggled round a bend, there would be a glimpse of rush walls, of peaked grass–roofs, a burst of yells, a whirl of black limbs, a mass of hands clapping. of feet stamping, of bodies swaying, of eyes rolling, under the droop of heavy and motionless foliage. The steamer toiled along slowly on the edge of a black and incomprehensible frenzy. The prehistoric man was cursing us, praying to us, welcoming us—who could tell? We were cut off from the comprehension of our surroundings; we glided past like phantoms, wondering and secretly appalled, as sane men would be before an enthusiastic outbreak in a madhouse.

[…]

The earth seemed unearthly. We are accustomed to look upon the shackled form of a conquered monster, but there—there you could look at a thing monstrous and free. It was unearthly, and the men were—No, they were not inhuman. Well, you know, that was the worst of it—this suspicion of their not being inhuman. It would come slowly to one. They howled and leaped, and spun, and made horrid faces; but what thrilled you was just the thought of their humanity—like yours—the thought of your remote kinship with this wild and passionate uproar. Ugly. Yes, it was ugly enough; but if you were man enough you would admit to yourself that there was in you just the faintest trace of a response to the terrible frankness of that noise, a dim suspicion of there being a meaning in it which you—you so remote from the night of first ages—could comprehend. And why not? The mind of man is capable of anything—because everything is in it, all the past as well as all the future. What was there after all? Joy, fear, sorrow, devotion, valour, rage—who can tell?—but truth—truth stripped of its cloak of time.”

—Joseph Conrad, Heart of Darkness ,1902

FFFFOUND! | Phyllis Galembo

"No one could think an evil thought while looking up"

— Kitecraft and kite tournaments  Charles M. Miller 1915

sarahdeann:

mystic-lady:

(via ottomanempire, erinmarshallturner)

"No one could think an evil thought while looking up"

Kitecraft and kite tournaments Charles M. Miller 1915

sarahdeann:

mystic-lady:

(via ottomanempire, erinmarshallturner)

Fifteen year-old Arthur Dayton whittles a deer with which he won a whittling contest in Bridgeport, Connecticut.

Fifteen year-old Arthur Dayton whittles a deer with which he won a whittling contest in Bridgeport, Connecticut.

String Along — Harry Smith Figures
via Best Made Co. (who was featured in yesterday’s New York Times)

This image is from a book of string figures by Harry Smith, the compiler of the enormously influential Anthology of American Folk Music.

"Harry Smith would talk at great length and in extraordinary depth on topics spanning many subjects and ranges of knowledge. […] a typical chain of free association might range from, for example, the macrocosm and the microcosm and the great chain of being to bioelectromagnetics and electrophysiology and the geomagnetic field and the psyche, Sylvanus Thompson and Max Knoll and the generation of phosphenes, musicology and molecular physics, parapsychology and poltergeist phenomena; the Margery and Helene Smith mediumship cases, the tarot and the Key of Solomon the King, Harold Scott MacDonald Coxeter’s Regular Polytopes and the Leech Lattice, his collection of 30,000 Ukrainian Easter eggs and Seminole quilts; alchemy and the Philosopher’s Stone; all in an effort to demonstrate the underlying connectedness and interrelatedness of all things for his audience of the moment."

Harry Smith — Wikipedia

String Along — Harry Smith Figures via Best Made Co. (who was featured in yesterday’s New York Times)

This image is from a book of string figures by Harry Smith, the compiler of the enormously influential Anthology of American Folk Music.

"Harry Smith would talk at great length and in extraordinary depth on topics spanning many subjects and ranges of knowledge. […] a typical chain of free association might range from, for example, the macrocosm and the microcosm and the great chain of being to bioelectromagnetics and electrophysiology and the geomagnetic field and the psyche, Sylvanus Thompson and Max Knoll and the generation of phosphenes, musicology and molecular physics, parapsychology and poltergeist phenomena; the Margery and Helene Smith mediumship cases, the tarot and the Key of Solomon the King, Harold Scott MacDonald Coxeter’s Regular Polytopes and the Leech Lattice, his collection of 30,000 Ukrainian Easter eggs and Seminole quilts; alchemy and the Philosopher’s Stone; all in an effort to demonstrate the underlying connectedness and interrelatedness of all things for his audience of the moment."

Harry Smith — Wikipedia

About:

Folk Object is an ongoing collection of graphic objects derived from the ornament & utility of folk culture. It's curated by Clifton Burt.

"The folk object stands outside both time and space. It signifies historicity and otherness...
The objects are less objects of ownership than of symbolic intercession, like ancestors. The marginal object stands outside the myth of progress embodied in modernity."
-Jean Baudrillard

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